Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Peter Hovestad

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Alicia Osland

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Neil Bousquet

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Peter Hovestad

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Alicia Osland

Osoyoos Lake

 Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Peter Hovestad

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Catherine Greve

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Peter Hovestad

Osoyoos Lake

Discover it… Enjoy it… Protect it!

 

Photo Credit: Neil Bousquet

Osoyoos Lake Water Quality Society

One of the many joys awaiting kayakers in the oxbows at the north end of Osoyoos Lake are the Spotted Dragonflies that love to entertain. These whimsical insects enjoy darting around the edges of the wetlands showing off their effortless flying skills. They are a challenge to photograph in a kayak. If you find one resting, take your photos quickly. Photo Credit: Neil Bousquet

 

Why is Osoyoos Lake Important?

The lake is home to a large variety of aquatic life and several endangered species.

It is a crucial waterway for the Columbia River salmon run.

It supplies water for homes, businesses, agriculture, and recreation.

It’s the number one attraction in Osoyoos for residents and visitors.

Osoyoos Lake has its own ecosystem.  Insects, fish, predators, lakeshore vegetation – even things like temperature and oxygen content, are inter-related.  Take out a tiny part of the ecosystem and the entire balance is upset, creating a ‘domino’ effect.  With an increase in population and development, it is everyone’s responsibility to protects its vulnerable water quality and surrounding aquifers.

The Society

Howard, the Painted Turtle spotted on dead head log in Ox Bows. Photo Credit: Neil Bousquet

The Osoyoos Lake Water Quality Society was founded in 1991 by community members to help promote public awareness of the lake, covering issues such as conservation, pollution, and lake management. It is a nonpolitical, non-profit charitable organization run entirely by volunteers.


Challenges to Osoyoos Lake Health

  • Increased lakeshore development, altering the shoreline and destroying fish habitat.

    Spring kayaking near Osoyoos Cottages. Photo Credit: Neil Bousquet

     

  • Wetlands and oxbows – nature’s water filter and answer to flood control – have also disappeared.
  • An increase in the geese population. Their droppings can carry disease such as E. coli.
  • Increased demands on the water supply by both agriculture and residential. Water in the Okanagan is not an infinite resource.
  • Increase in boat traffic resulting in erosion, water and noise pollution, and safety issues.
  • Decades of runoff from agricultural practices and nutrient deposits directly into the Lake.
  • Runoff from streets via storm drains which lead directly to the Lake.
  • An accumulation of pollution from the Okanagan River and communities to the north of us.
  • An increase of chemicals has created ideal conditions for milfoil and other aquatic weeds.

Recent Posts

Osoyoos Lake Water Quality Status and Trends

In our ongoing attempts to educate and inform residents of the south Okanagan about the importance of Osoyoos Lake  to the economy of Osoyoos-Oliver area, and the province of British Columbia, the OLWQS invited Michael Sokal, Ph.D. Impact Assessment Biologist,...

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